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[personal profile] imomus
• The photo of the world's longest bridge, which is also the most expensive to cross. I took this photo from the Tako ferry, in order to avoid paying $150 to cross the bridge. The sun was setting and the bridge was lit dramatically against enormous clouds.



• The photo of our satisfying stark and trad ryokan room in Takamatsu, the port town on the northern coast of Shikoku. Part of my naked torso can be seen framed in a dark doorway, looking very Francis Bacon. But the main subject of the picture is the beautiful red duvet, with a snap-on sheet rounding the futon's corners.



• The forbidden photo of the elephant's secret vagina in Shinro Ohtake's glorious Naoshima bathhouse, I (heart) Yu. Plus, I guess. the snap I furtively grabbed of myself naked there, when I had the room to myself. Very bad.



• The photo of Hisae "doing a Harry Worth" on the mirrored pillar at the SANAA Naoshima Ferry Terminal. Harry Worth is a British 1960s comedian whose opening sequence showed him bisected laterally by a mirror, raising one arm and one leg. SANAA are the world's greatest and most understated architects.



• Literally umpteen hundred photos -- all taken in perfect sunny weather -- of the artists' house installations on Naoshima, a sort of permanent biennial crossed with a cultural / religious theme park. I say "religious" because going into an underground chamber to see Hiroshi Sugimoto's glass staircase and his framing of the sea, or entering a pitch-black James Turrell hut and gradually "seeing the light" is like experiencing some ultra-slick new religion designed by artists.

I can't show you these photos because I don't have a laptop with me. I also can't show you tomorrow's snaps of my adventures with Yoyo and Hisae in the wilds of Shikoku because tomorrow hasn't happened yet, and because we have no idea what we'll get up to.

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 10:13 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Have you heard of Masanobu Fukuoka and his One Straw Revolution? Apparently he lived on Shikoku. Might be a lead...?

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 02:01 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
too rustic for our cosmopolitan friend, I'm afraid.

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 02:03 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
I thought he was into all that harmony with nature stuff?

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 11:36 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
The only thing I want to know is, how is that elephant preserved?? Does it smell like dead elephant in the sento? Is it encased in glass? Is it painted with a thick waterproof coating? Surely all that humidity can't be good for an elephant.

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 01:57 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] imomus.livejournal.com
It's a very realistic replica of an elephant, not the real thing.

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 11:48 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
もうすぐ、新しい家にお引っ越しするらしい?

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 11:51 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
There must be more -- what photos can't you show because you haven't taken them, for example?

life in japan

Date: 2010-01-09 12:33 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Dear Momus,

do you mind my sharing some thoughts on the Japanese? I wonder what you think of these thoughts, it would help me in understanding life here better I think.

Do they (the Japanese) every seem a little less real as individuals than folks in the West? What I mean is, everything they do here seems like a very good copy, but not the real thing. I don't mean to be rude at all, I just have a hard time getting any real feelings or individualness from them. At the end of the day sometimes I almost have to tell myself,'No, ___, it's not true. they DO have feelings and expressions, they just don't use them and you're not Japanese so you can't understand'. Before I came here, they seemed like they would be more interesting, lively, more interested in sharing. Being here, I find it very hard to see them the same way for some reason.

They kind of seem like a club I can't join. When this happens, I'm not at all as interested in what they're doing...

(sorry, long)...



Re: life in japan

Date: 2010-01-09 03:11 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] imomus.livejournal.com
I think often what seems "real" is just what we're used to.

I think it's true that you'll never be accepted as one of them, but I don't think you should take that as a reason to feel estranged from Japanese people. What might help, though, is some self-deprecation, some dislike of your own culture, even some masochism or voyeurism (put more romantically, some unrequited love. Those states of mind allow you to relish being an outsider. It can give you a certain liberty; you're forever the foolish, selfish foreigner who can't be expectef to comply with all the strict obligations Japanese have.

Re: life in japan

Date: 2010-01-10 02:18 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
how foreigners seem to the Japanese:



Re: life in japan

Date: 2010-01-10 04:40 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] milky-eyes.livejournal.com
[Error: unknown template video]

Re: life in japan

Date: 2010-01-13 12:34 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
this guy was a dick.

Re: life in japan

Date: 2010-01-10 04:34 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] milky-eyes.livejournal.com
Re: life in japan

momus,

You are one of the nicest, thoughtful, open, sharing people I knowingly come in contact with (via the internet)... that was a very nice thoughtful response.

There are so many less nice, or less thoughtful things you could have said.

Thats probably the best thing anyone could have said, word for word.

I'm so impressed.

and the spelling errors btw just added a certain cuteness to the whole thing.
you're like a lovable big furry teddybear.
--------------------------

love the abstract photo entry.

Re: life in japan

Date: 2010-01-11 02:24 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] krring.livejournal.com
Hearing you talk like that makes me picture two errant Roman soldiers.

"We are here at the walled city, and deo volente, we will soon be ushered to partake of the feasting that sweeps all nations this great eve!"
"Nay, for Empire and Emperor, by charm or by storm will we admit ourselves to such merriment!"
"But Hark, people from on high heave their refusal out through their bosoms - and what have we with which to penetrate and subsequently to sit at feast with foes as if with friends?"
"My friend, this assailment is but an hieroglyphic token, a symbolic trial not of brawn but of meek devotion. Come, impale in vain the mortar of this prodigious obstacle and savour the ring of the bronze, the vast immobility with which your efforts are cast back at you. With such feeble means, we already pour glory on our populace for struggling as impelled by the yoke of this decree of war."
And the wiser legionary with the Latin phrasebook retorted, "Who, pray, decreed any war? What yoke, pray, pins us to this callous wall? Why not continue on to find the feasting to which our hopes were formerly aligned? Dum vivimus vivamus."

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 12:50 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
Are you O.K., Momus? There are spelling mistakes in your post.

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 12:52 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
he's typing it all on his ipod touch, that's why. those things are a real bugger to type on.

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 01:35 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] urban-ospreys.livejournal.com
Hiroshi Sugimoto's staircase was my favourite element of the Palais de Tokyo show.

Kind of a revelation - why are religious structures so much about stone when they could be about glass?

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-09 02:03 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
most of the top churches were made before central air. Try selling folks in 18C England on an all glass church.
From: [identity profile] urban-ospreys.livejournal.com
Sure, but windows are functional. Stained glass is decorated function. Glass steps, floors or walls are pure atmosphere. Less like a crypt, more like heaven. There is an element of "oligarchs's bachelor pad" to glass steps too, though..


From: (Anonymous)
There's a big church in the States that is used in televised church services that is all made of glass - the Crystal Cathedral.
From: [identity profile] count-vronsky.livejournal.com
Yuck. I think Jesus himself might even cast the first stone at that ugly thing.

I'd pray here though.

Image
From: [identity profile] milky-eyes.livejournal.com
no... I'm not burning any churches. and not those for sure...

but I'd rather 'pray' somewhere like this....

Image

Las Pozas, Xilitla
From: [identity profile] count-vronsky.livejournal.com
kewl! I'd 'pray' there too :)

if I was in Japan, I'd go here

Image

if I wanted to smoke opium I'd go here though

Image
From: [identity profile] milky-eyes.livejournal.com
that would be an amazing place to smoke opium.

I think would be good for that too...

Image

(no subject)

Date: 2010-01-10 12:54 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
どうしましょ。
ルイスと結婚してあのお家を買う?

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